EzriCare® Artificial Tears Lawsuit

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has linked Delsam Pharma® and EzriCare® Artificial Tears over-the-counter eye drops to drug-resistant eye infections. The bacterial infections have caused blindness in some people and several patients have died. An EzriCare Artificial Tears lawsuit can help affected individuals pursue financial compensation.

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2023 Update: CDC Says Patients Should Stop Using EzriCare Tears

On Feb. 1, 2023, the CDC issued a Health Advisory concerning eye infections associated with using EzriCare Artificial Tears. The preservative-free lubricant eye drop is used to treat dry eye and is sold in multidose bottles by major retailers such as Walmart and Amazon.

Specifically, the CDC has identified 81 patients in 18 states with a type of antibiotic-resistant bacterial infection known as carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (CRPA). Sadly, 4 patients have died.

“Recent epidemiology and laboratory evidence link those infections to use of EzriCare Artificial Tears.”

— Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

The CDC said it has detected CRPA in opened bottles of EzriCare Artificial Tears.

The affected eye drops are:

  • EzriCare NDC 79503-0101-15, UPC 3 79503 10115 7
  • Delsam Pharma’s NDC 72570-121-15, UPC-72570-0121-15

On February 22, 2023, the FDA included Delsam Pharma’s Artificial Eye Ointment in its warning because of possible bacterial contamination.

The agency recommends that health care providers and consumers “immediately discontinue using EzriCare Artificial Tears.”

The U.S. Food & Drug Administration has issued a similar warning.

Additionally, Global Pharma Healthcare Private Limited, the product manufacturer, has initiated a voluntary product recall based on the FDA’s recommendation.

When a product harms innocent people, they may be able to take legal action and file a product liability lawsuit. For example, an EzriCare Artificial Tears lawsuit allows injured consumers to pursue financial compensation for medical bills, pain and suffering, and more and hold negligent drug companies accountable.

As of February 10, 2023, victims have started filing lawsuits related to EzriCare use.

EzriCare Artificial Tears & Eye Infections

People who have used EzriCare Artificial Tears are at risk of carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (CRPA), a type of bacterial infection resistant to a class of antibiotics known as carbapenems.

A person uses EzriCare Artificial Tears eye drops

Pseudomonas is a type of bacteria commonly found in soil and water. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the strain that is most likely to make people sick. It can cause infections in the blood, lungs, and other parts of the body.

CRPA in the eyes can cause eye infections such as:

  • Conjunctivitis (pink eye)
  • Endophthalmitis (inflammation inside the eye)
  • Keratitis (inflammation of the cornea)

List of Contaminated Eye Drops

Unfortunately, EzriCare is not the only brand of eye drops that poses a danger.

On October 27, 2023, the FDA warned consumers about more than two dozen other over-the-counter eye drops that could cause infection and lead to vision loss. FDA investigators found unsanitary conditions, including bacterial contamination, at the manufacturing facility.

These products are listed below by brand.

CVS Health:

  • Lubricant Eye Drops 10 ml (single and twin packs)
  • Lubricant Eye Drops 15 ml (single and twin packs)
  • Lubricating Gel drops 10 ml
  • Lubricant Gel Drops 15 ml (single and twin pack)
  • Mild Moderate Lubricating Eye Drops 15 ml (single pack)
  • Multi-Action Relief Drops 15 ml

Leader (Cardinal Health):

  • Dry Eye Relief 10 ml
  • Dry Eye Relief 15 ml
  • Eye Irritation Relief 15 ml
  • Lubricant Eye Drops 15 ml (single and twin packs)

Rite Aid:

  • Gentle Lubricant Gel Eye Drops 15 ml
  • Lubricant Eye Drops 10 ml (twin pack)
  • Lubricant Eye Drops 15 ml (twin pack)
  • Lubricant Gel Drops 15 ml
  • Lubricating Gel Drops 10 ml
  • Multi-Action Relief Drops 15 ml

Rugby (Cardinal Health):

  • Lubricating Tears Eye Drops 15 ml
  • Polyvinyl Alcohol 1.4% Lubricating Eye Drops 15 ml

Target:

  • Up & Up™ Dry Eye Relief Lubricant Eye Drops 30 ml
  • Up & Up™ Extreme Relief Dry Eye 15 ml (single pack)
  • Up & Up™ Extreme Relief Dry Eye 30 ml (twin pack)

Velocity Pharma LLC:

  • Lubricant Eye Drop 10 ml (triple pack)

Walmart:

  • Equate Hydration PF Lubricant Eye Drop 10 ml

In August 2023, the FDA issued a similar warning about two other brands of eye drops after finding evidence of bacterial and fungal contamination.

  • LightEyez MSM Eye Drops Eye Repair product
  • Dr. Berne’s MSM Drops 5% Solution

The FDA advises patients who experience eye infection symptoms after using any of the products listed above to seek immediate medical care.

What Are the Symptoms of EzriCare Artificial Tears Eye Infections?

People who have used EzriCare Artificial Tears should know the symptoms of a CRPA eye infection to protect their health.

Symptoms of CRPA eye infections often include:

  • Blurred vision
  • Discharge from the eye
  • Feeling of something in the eye
  • Light sensitivity
  • Pain in the eye
  • Red or swollen eyes

Of the 81 patients the CDC is monitoring, the outcomes include:

  • Eye infection (including keratitis and endophthalmitis)
  • Hospitalization
  • Permanent vision loss (blindness)
  • Respiratory infection
  • Sepsis (bloodstream infection)
  • Surgical removal of eyeball (enucleation)
  • Urinary tract infection

Additionally, four patients have died after the bacterium invaded their bloodstream.

Patients with cataracts, glaucoma, and other eye conditions are most likely to experience vision loss and other serious eye issues. In addition, people with compromised immune systems are most at risk of life-threatening health problems.

People who have used EzriCare Artificial Tears but are not showing signs of infection do not need to get tested for CRPA, according to the CDC.

If you or a loved one are experiencing eye infection symptoms or other health issues after using Ezricare Artificial Tears eye drops, get medical attention as soon as possible.

How Are EzriCare Artificial Tears Eye Infections Treated?

Doctors treat CRPA eye infections with antibiotics in most cases.

Specifically, treatment options for CRPA eye infections may include:

  • Antibiotics (given intravenously or as eye drops)
  • Drainage of infected tissue
  • Surgery

The CDC notes that CRPA infections are becoming more challenging to treat because of increasing antibiotic resistance.

“For some multidrug-resistant types of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, treatment options might be limited.”

– Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

If your doctor instructed you to use EzriCare Artificial Tears, you should ask them about a different artificial tears eye drop to use.

Get Help With an EzriCare Artificial Tears Lawsuit

EzriCare Artificial Tears eye drop users who have been harmed by this dangerous product have the right to seek compensation and justice.

In general, people eligible for an EzriCare Artificial Tears lawsuit are those who used EzriCare Artificial Tears Lubricant Eye Drops and later:

  • Developed an eye infection or other infection and/or
  • Experienced vision loss or another injury

The first step in filing an EzriCare Artificial Tears Lawsuit is to partner with an experienced personal injury lawyer. The attorneys in our network that work on dangerous product cases have a proven track record of helping people like you across the United States.

These lawyers can handle your case from filing to resolution and have the resources to take on powerful drug companies. They charge no up-front or out of pocket costs — the law firms only get paid if they recover compensation for you.

FAQs About EzriCare Artificial Tears

Are artificial tears safe?

Yes, most artificial tears are safe for use. However, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on Feb. 1, 2023, issued a Health Advisory instructing consumers to immediately stop using EzriCare Artificial Tears because the eye drop has been linked to drug-resistant eye infections.

Other eye drops that pose a risk of infection include:

  • Delsam Pharma Artificial Tears
  • Dr. Berne’s MSM Drops
  • LightEyez MSM Eye Drops – Eye Repair
  • Various eye drops sold under brand names affiliated with CVS, Leader (Cardinal Health), Rugby (Cardinal Health), Rite Aid, Target, Velocity Pharma, and Walmart

Which brand of eye drops is being recalled?

Eye drops sold under the brand name EzriCare Artificial Tears have been recalled. Global Pharma, the company that makes EzriCare Artificial Tears, issued the voluntary recall on Feb. 2, 2023, because of possible bacterial contamination.

The FDA suggested the recall based on Global Pharma’s violation of manufacturing regulations. For example, the agency said Global Pharma:

  • Failed to properly test the eye drops for bacteria
  • Manufactured the eye drops in multi-use bottles without a sufficient preservative

The FDA says these eyedrops pose similar risks:

  • Delsam Pharma Artificial Tears
  • Dr. Berne’s MSM Drops
  • LightEyez MSM Eye Drops – Eye Repair
  • Eyedrops sold under brands associated with CVS, Leader (Cardinal Health), Rugby (Cardinal Health), Rite Aid, Target, Velocity Pharma, and Walmart

Who manufactures EzriCare Artificial Tears?

Global Pharma Healthcare Private Limited manufactures EzriCare Artificial Tears in India. The product is distributed in the United States by Aru Pharma Inc. and Delsam Pharma.

On Feb. 2, 2023, the company voluntarily recalled the product, saying in its risk statement that use of EzriCare Artificial Tears “can result in the risk of eye infections that could result in blindness.”

What is CRPA?

CRPA is short for carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a strain of bacteria resistant to standard antibiotics. So far, the CDC has identified 81 patients in 18 states with the infection.

Most of the patients reported using EzriCare Artificial Tears — a preservative-free eye drop used to treat dry eye — before they became sick. The manufacturer has recalled the product.

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ReferencesView References
  1. Baptist Health. “Eye Infections.” Retrieved from: https://www.baptisthealth.com/care-services/conditions-treatments/eye-infections. Accessed on November 1, 2023.
  2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Healthcare Settings.” Retrieved from: https://www.cdc.gov/hai/organisms/pseudomonas.html. Accessed on November 1, 2023.
  3. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “Outbreak of Extensively Drug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Associated with Artificial Tears.” Retrieved from: https://www.cdc.gov/hai/outbreaks/crpa-artificial-tears.html. Accessed on November 1, 2023.
  4. EzriCare.com. “EzriCare Artificial Tears – Discontinue Use.” Retrieved from: https://ezricare-info.com/. Accessed on November 1, 2023.
  5. Microbe Notes. “Carbapenem-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (CRPA).” Retrieved from: https://microbenotes.com/carbapenem-resistant-pseudomonas-aeruginosa-crpa/#eye-infections. Accessed on November 1, 2023.
  6. NBCNews.com. “CDC warns that a brand of eyedrops may be linked to drug-resistant bacterial infections.” Retrieved from: https://www.nbcnews.com/health/health-news/cdc-eyedrops-linked-serious-bacterial-infections-rcna68175. Accessed on November 1, 2023.
  7. NPR. “The FDA warns consumers to stop using several eyedrop products due to infection risk.” Retrieved from: https://www.npr.org/2023/10/29/1209279307/fda-eyedrops-contamination. Accessed on November 1, 2023.
  8. Sokolove Law. “EzriCare® Artificial Tears Lawsuit.” Retrieved from: https://www.sokolovelaw.com/product-liability/ezricare-artificial-tears/. Accessed on November 1, 2023.
  9. U.S. Food & Drug Administration. “FDA warns consumers not to purchase or use EzriCare Artificial Tears due to potential contamination.” Retrieved from: https://www.fda.gov/drugs/drug-safety-and-availability/fda-warns-consumers-not-purchase-or-use-ezricare-artificial-tears-due-potential-contamination. Accessed on November 1, 2023.
  10. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. “FDA warns consumers not to purchase or use certain eye drops from several major brands due to risk of eye infection.” Retrieved from: https://www.fda.gov/drugs/drug-safety-and-availability/fda-warns-consumers-not-purchase-or-use-certain-eye-drops-several-major-brands-due-risk-eye#eyedrops. Accessed on November 1, 2023.
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